Choosing a Side: Examining the Abortion Debate

Applying Systems Thinking to the abortion debate could permit discourse without the volatility of political rhetoric and the policy cycle.

Systems Thinking for Policymaking: The Case of Indigenous Women’s Rights in Mexico 

In this introductory piece of the Second Systems Thinking Special Edition, Paulina Lucio Maymon explains how to address the social injustice of indigenous peoples in Mexico using Systems Thinking – a method to analyze a diverse array of policy-relevant issues.

Introduction to the Second Systems Thinking Special Edition

Second Systems Thinking Special Edition Systems thinking is a popular lens that lends significant insights into problems, issues or situations in many different fields. This Special Edition provides a demonstration of the application of Systems Thinking to policy related issues in many areas such as resource management, race, and education. All of these papers show… Read more »

Editorial Note for the Second Systems Thinking Special Edition

In our Second Systems Thinking Special Edition, five Fellows of the Cornell Institute for Public Affairs (CIPA) apply Systems Thinking as a policy analysis tool to facilitate a better understanding of public policies.

indigenous people mexico

Bridging the Indigenous Wage Gap in Mexico

The accumulation of human capital is a necessary condition for indigenous people to overcome poverty in Mexico, but it is not itself sufficient.

The Rise and Fall of Vermont’s Single Payer Plan

Green Mountain Care in Vermont aimed to be a paradigm for comprehensive healthcare reform at both the state and federal level. What caused its fall?

BQX

The Anatomy of New Public Transit: Opportunities and Challenges of the Brooklyn Queens Connector (BQX) Streetcar

In two years the Brooklyn-Queens Connector (BQX) has made impressive progress but still has a number of issues to address before its completion.

alumni retention

Alumni Retention in United States Metropolitan Statistical Areas

It’s in the best interest of metropolitan areas to maintain an educated, young population, but how policy makers can secure alumni retention is tricker.

climate change native communities

Native Communities in Alaska: Vulnerabilities in Light of Climate Change

Climate change in Alaska will increase the risk of natural disasters, and due to sparsely located emergency resources, native communities are most at risk.

Rochester Inner Loop

A Geospatial Analysis of the Physical and Economic Consequences of Rochester’s Inner Loop

How Rochester’s Inner Loop became the city’s inner noose – cutting off downtown, creating policy challenges and lessons in transportation infrastructure.

Latest
  • Rethinking Energy Subsidies in Mexico

    Subsidizing fossil fuel consumption has increased the income gap in the world´s population, since these subsidies have primarily benefited individuals with greater wealth. Globally, it is estimated that, in 2010, only 8% of the subsidies for fossil fuel consumption reached the poorest 20% of the world’s population.

  • The Heroin Epidemic: Policy Strategies for Solving a Two-sided Crisis

    Over the past decade, Mexico and the United States have experienced an heroin epidemic that might not be easily solved. An estimated 914,000 people reported using heroin in the past year in the United States, causing the death of over 47,000. How can the rapid increase of demand and supply of the drug be explained? Most importantly, how can it be solved?

  • Russian Disinformation: How U.S. Information Operations Need to Adapt

    Building on a legacy of propaganda and information warfare, Russia has displayed a unique ability to selectively obscure truth, seed doubt, and spread disinformation on a global scale. With Russia’s gaze set on the United States as a rival in an increasingly multipolar world, the United States has already felt the impact of these types of information operations (IO) through the hacking and selective releasing of emails relating to Hillary Clinton and the Democratic National Committee.

  • Empowered Policy: Evidence of Sustainable, Accessible, and Affordable Energy Resources

    edited by Shreya Bhardwaj Economic prosperity and societal well-being require a safe and reliable supply of energy resources. Energy and mineral resources are vital for the production of goods and services across all economic sectors: agriculture, infrastructure, transportation, commerce, healthcare, and tourism, among others. At the same time that energy resources contribute to a crucial… Read more »

  • How Much Will You Pay to Save the Amazon?

    Agricultural practices that preserve ecosystem services are growing. Nongovernmental organizations have taken a market-based approach, introducing certification programs which compensate farmers who adhere to sustainability standards for their consequent reductions in yield by charging consumers a price premium. We conduct a choice experiment to test consumers’ willingness to pay for such eco-labeled products.

  • Roses Must Be Tended: The Sweet Briar College Case

    On March 3, 2015, the Sweet Briar College Board of Directors announced that the college would cease its operations, due to “insurmountable financial challenges.” This announcement came as a shock to most alumnae—the 114-year-old women’s college had an endowment of $84 million, and the Board had done nothing to signal that the financial situation was… Read more »

  • Low Cost Meat, High Cost to Social Justice

    While the emergence of government oversight and creation of food safety laws helped transform meatpacking into a respectable industry, today we are witness to a return to unsanitary and unethical conditions. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, the meat processing and animal slaughtering industry has the highest rate of workplace illness in the United States.

  • Vidya Dadati Vinayam: The Ordeal to Open the Doors of Education

    Education liberates society and creates thinking individuals who tend to have the twin abilities to insulate themselves from dogma and propaganda and at the same time to open themselves up, to give their best to the outer world. It is the moral responsibility of the government of India, and indeed of each educated person in the nation, to ensure that education reaches those who have been deprived of it.

  • What is the Best Coping Strategy for Vulnerable Smallholder Farmers in Climate Change?

    The stress on water availability that has been induced by climate causes smallholders’ crop productivity to decline. Fang Zhang conducted a research in Nsanje district of Malawi as part of an effort to evaluate a program intervention and to understand vulnerable populations’ experiences in adapting to climate change.

  • Coaching Management: An Alternative to Performance Evaluation

    How many people can say that when they get told off for not reaching their target or for poor behavior they themselves thought of the solution? Well, the answer is many more than before. Coaching has become the new buzzword within management. Instead of conducting oft-dreaded annual performance reviews, many managers are switching to a… Read more »

  • Student Led Shutdowns: “Fees Must Fall” and the Fight for Affordable, Accessible Education in South Africa

    It has been twenty years since the end of Apartheid in South Africa, but student protests erupting across the nation’s universities suggest that two decades of African National Congress rule have not been enough to meet the demands for socioeconomic equality of many citizens. Images of students under the moniker “Fees Must Fall” battling police… Read more »

  • Interview with Senator Jorge Robledo of Colombia

    The Cornell Policy Review interviewed Senator Jorge Robledo, from Colombia, during his visit to the Cornell campus in Ithaca. He talked about the recent rejection of the peace process agreement in Colombia and other relevant issues.