The Need for Institutional Reform at the National Minorities Commission, India

Arpit Chaturvedi discusses ways in which the National Commission for Minorities in India could be ameliorated with institutional reforms.

cornell policy review

Introducing our First Class of Associate Managers

The Cornell Policy Review proudly announces its first-ever class of Associate Managers.

Improving Public Service Delivery in Pakistan

CIPA MPA Fellow Mohammad Zohair proposed a public service delivery system for Pakistan using the Vision, Mission, Capacity and Learning Framework created by Cornell University professors Derek and Laura Cabrera.

Rigging Elections: A Spatial Statistics Analysis of Political and Unintentional Gerrymandering

The 2016 election cycle was fraught with claims of election rigging. Though mostly unsubstantiated, there may be some truth to these claims — at least at the congressional level.

cornell policy review

Introducing our New Class of Associate Editors

The Cornell Policy Review is pleased to announce the Fall 2017 selections for Associate Editor positions.

local elections

Political Knowledge and the Paradox of Voting

The nation’s fascination with big, flashy elections at the expense of small, local elections is laden with irony.

Credit: Ajay Verma/Reuters

Policy Gaps in Prevention of Vector-Borne Diseases in India

RGCIS Fellow Wakima Kapur analyzes the policy gaps and solutions to contain the problem of Vector Borne Diseases in India.

The Flint Water Crisis: Using Systems Thinking to Understand Critical Failures

This piece examines how Systems Thinking can be used to understand the critical failures in a complex crisis like the Flint, Michigan water crisis, and the steps that can be taken to remedy such shortfalls.

Problems with Distinctions and Perspectives Impairing the Debate on Common Core

By using Common Core as a timely example, Fiduccia points out that taking perspectives dissimilar to your own presents an opportunity to gain valuable insight.

Latest
  • electoral college

    Dropping Out of the Electoral College

    The most common modern arguments for keeping the electoral college are based on false information and assumptions or have major weaknesses, so how do we replace or fix the system?

  • chaebol south korea

    Politics, Family-Run Conglomerates, and Corruption in South Korea

    The election of Mr. Moon Jae-in as President of South Korea means a welcomed crackdown on corruption and reform of family-run conglomerates.

  • migrant women

    The Feminization of Migration: Why are Women Moving More?

    Migrant women are being pushed to migrate in search of better opportunities, and because of their invisibility do so with few or no legal protections.

  • The One President Thesis: Do Politics Really “Stop at the Water’s Edge”?

    There have been many historical iterations of the concept that the U.S. Congress behaves differently regarding foreign affairs than it does for domestic affairs. The first iteration of this was the two presidents thesis, which suggests that the president has increased latitude in foreign affairs and can consequently behave differently in that context than in domestic affairs.

  • 30 Days of Demonetization in India

    At midnight on November 8, 2016, Mr. Narendra Modi, the Prime Minister (PM) of India, declared in a broadcast to the nation that the two highest currency notes—Rs. 500 and Rs. 1000—would immediately cease to be legal tender. This move was considered a very drastic and bold step, especially since nearly 86% of all the currency by value in India was in the form of either Rs. 500 or Rs. 1000 notes.

  • Was the Syria Strike illegal? Explaining the International Law of Warfare

      The recent US missile attack against the sovereign state of Syria was an act of aggression bearing distinct resemblance to the strike on Iraq in 2003. On April 6, 2017, the United States military dropped nearly 60 cruise missiles at a Syrian airfield; this strike was in response to President Bashar al-Assad’s usage of… Read more »

  • Introducing the Upcoming Cornell Policy Review Board

    The Cornell Policy Review is pleased to announce the 2017-2018 selections for Editor in Chief, Senior Managing Editor, Senior Content Editor, and Senior Public Relations Editor. Please join us in congratulating Arpit Chaturvedi, Paulina Lucio, Elizabeth Sweitzer, and Lillie Gabreski on their new roles, which will officially begin in May of this year. As Associate… Read more »

  • /Users/cvr34/Desktop/The_Lobby_of_the_House_of_Commons,_1886_by_Liborio_Prosperi_('Lib').jpg

    Lobby Law in Chile: Democratizing Access to Public Authorities

    The Lobbying Act of 2014, a reform 10 years in the making, and the commitments of the Chilean government in its Open Government Partnership (OGP) National Action Plan (NAP) to adopt and implement the legislation, must be situated in the wider context of reforms designed to combat corruption and promote transparency.

  • UK’s International Role, Post-Brexit

    On June 23, 2016, a majority of the British people voted to leave the European Union. The political earthquake that followed Brexit is now beginning to stabilize, and the British population is beginning to demand answers about how future negotiations with the European Union (EU) will be carried out. The truth, as in all negotiations, is that there is no answer—outcomes will depend not only on the British government but also, clearly, on the position the EU takes.

  • A Matter of Political Time: The Rise of Populist Leaders

    With the commotion of the 2016 U.S. Presidential election still echoing, pundits have looked inward to understand what the weekly polls got wrong. Incomplete sample sizes, overestimated voter turnouts, and incorrect assumptions about demographic loyalties are topping recent lists of explanations for how President Donald Trump captured over 270 electoral votes. Trump’s victory over long-time… Read more »

  • Environmentalism in the Space Age: An Analysis of the Space Junk Problem and Potential Solutions

    NASA has been studying debris hazards to (and caused by) spacecraft for over a decade, and there is a host of international organizations involved with the dense thicket of regulations governing environmental issues in outer space. Of particular concern is debris, more colloquially known as “space junk.”

  • Misleading Incentives – South Asian Farmers’ Use of Fertilizer

    Since the Green Revolution in the 1960s to 1980s, which introduced high-yielding varieties of crops, improved fertilizer, irrigation, and pesticides to agriculture in developing countries, South Asia’s appetite for inorganic fertilizer has not stopped. In 2012-3, fertilizer consumption in this area accounts for 18 percent of the world’s total usage. India alone consumed 28.1 million tons of fertilizer in 2010, making it number two in the world, after China. However, farmers in South Asia do not use the appropriate ratio of nitrogen (N), phosphate (P), and potash (K) fertilizer that would increase their yields.