Was the Syria Strike illegal? Explaining the International Law of Warfare

  The recent US missile attack against the sovereign state of Syria was an act of aggression bearing distinct resemblance to the strike on Iraq in 2003. On April 6, 2017, the United States military dropped nearly 60 cruise missiles at a Syrian airfield; this strike was in response to President Bashar al-Assad’s usage of… Read more »

Introducing the Upcoming Cornell Policy Review Board

The Cornell Policy Review is pleased to announce the 2017-2018 selections for Editor in Chief, Senior Managing Editor, Senior Content Editor, and Senior Public Relations Editor. Please join us in congratulating Arpit Chaturvedi, Paulina Lucio, Elizabeth Sweitzer, and Lillie Gabreski on their new roles, which will officially begin in May of this year. As Associate… Read more »

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Lobby Law in Chile: Democratizing Access to Public Authorities

The Lobbying Act of 2014, a reform 10 years in the making, and the commitments of the Chilean government in its Open Government Partnership (OGP) National Action Plan (NAP) to adopt and implement the legislation, must be situated in the wider context of reforms designed to combat corruption and promote transparency.

UK’s International Role, Post-Brexit

On June 23, 2016, a majority of the British people voted to leave the European Union. The political earthquake that followed Brexit is now beginning to stabilize, and the British population is beginning to demand answers about how future negotiations with the European Union (EU) will be carried out. The truth, as in all negotiations, is that there is no answer—outcomes will depend not only on the British government but also, clearly, on the position the EU takes.

A Matter of Political Time: The Rise of Populist Leaders

With the commotion of the 2016 U.S. Presidential election still echoing, pundits have looked inward to understand what the weekly polls got wrong. Incomplete sample sizes, overestimated voter turnouts, and incorrect assumptions about demographic loyalties are topping recent lists of explanations for how President Donald Trump captured over 270 electoral votes. Trump’s victory over long-time… Read more »

Environmentalism in the Space Age: An Analysis of the Space Junk Problem and Potential Solutions

NASA has been studying debris hazards to (and caused by) spacecraft for over a decade, and there is a host of international organizations involved with the dense thicket of regulations governing environmental issues in outer space. Of particular concern is debris, more colloquially known as “space junk.”

Misleading Incentives – South Asian Farmers’ Use of Fertilizer

Since the Green Revolution in the 1960s to 1980s, which introduced high-yielding varieties of crops, improved fertilizer, irrigation, and pesticides to agriculture in developing countries, South Asia’s appetite for inorganic fertilizer has not stopped. In 2012-3, fertilizer consumption in this area accounts for 18 percent of the world’s total usage. India alone consumed 28.1 million tons of fertilizer in 2010, making it number two in the world, after China. However, farmers in South Asia do not use the appropriate ratio of nitrogen (N), phosphate (P), and potash (K) fertilizer that would increase their yields.

Creating Corporate Social Responsibility for the Nonprofit Sector

In the private sector, profit maximization has historically been the most important figure to measure success, yet in recent years there has been a nascent but powerful movement that also measures environmental and social implications. This approach to business has been popularized as “corporate social responsibility” (CSR) and is becoming more structured and legitimized with third party certifiers. Meanwhile the nonprofit, or plural sector, lacks a similar framework that allows donors to better understand business ethics.

Mobile Money Impact Evaluations: A Review

The 2000 Millennium Development Goals established by the United Nations provided a universally agreed upon set of objectives for all its member nations to follow. The first Goal that was identified was the elimination of poverty. Eradication of poverty subsequently became the focus of many initiatives by many organizations and governments around the world. To address some of the problems related to poverty, Mohamed Yunus started a financing scheme that would later develop into microfinance.

An Outsider Look at the US Presidential Elections

Almost 650 days have passed since Hillary Clinton announced her candidacy for the Presidency. Nearly 550 since President-elect Donald Trump did the same. More than a year and a half since this competition started, I cannot believe it is finally over and Donald Trump has been inaugurated as President. Certainly, the results were shocking for most of us: for the campaigns, for the pollsters, and for the pundits, among others.

Latest
  • What is the Best Coping Strategy for Vulnerable Smallholder Farmers in Climate Change?

    The stress on water availability that has been induced by climate causes smallholders’ crop productivity to decline. Fang Zhang conducted a research in Nsanje district of Malawi as part of an effort to evaluate a program intervention and to understand vulnerable populations’ experiences in adapting to climate change.

  • Coaching Management: An Alternative to Performance Evaluation

    How many people can say that when they get told off for not reaching their target or for poor behavior they themselves thought of the solution? Well, the answer is many more than before. Coaching has become the new buzzword within management. Instead of conducting oft-dreaded annual performance reviews, many managers are switching to a… Read more »

  • Student Led Shutdowns: “Fees Must Fall” and the Fight for Affordable, Accessible Education in South Africa

    It has been twenty years since the end of Apartheid in South Africa, but student protests erupting across the nation’s universities suggest that two decades of African National Congress rule have not been enough to meet the demands for socioeconomic equality of many citizens. Images of students under the moniker “Fees Must Fall” battling police… Read more »

  • Interview with Senator Jorge Robledo of Colombia

    The Cornell Policy Review interviewed Senator Jorge Robledo, from Colombia, during his visit to the Cornell campus in Ithaca. He talked about the recent rejection of the peace process agreement in Colombia and other relevant issues.

  • Centralizing the Police Force: What It Means For Mexico’s Narco Violence

    It is a well-known fact to Mexican citizens, journalists and academics that, beginning 2007 when former President Felipe Calderon declared war on the drug cartels, Mexico became an extremely violent country: going from an average of 9,000 people killed a year to over 27,000. While the country’s murder rate still lags behind that of some… Read more »

  • Wa[te]r and Peace

    The summer of 2014 took me back to my ancestral village in central Punjab, Pakistan where my team of student volunteers and I installed a solar powered water pump in response to a severe water shortage, which had been exacerbated due to nationwide electricity shortfalls. The pump provides clean drinking water daily to roughly 1000 of the town’s 1,500 residents, and it has had a dramatic impact on the village’s economic and societal well-being.

  • The Impacts of Ending China’s One-Child Policy

    On October 29, 2015, China scrapped its one-child policy, allowing all couples to have two children for the first time since strict family planning rules were introduced more than three decades ago. Despite the optimistic responses of some demographers and citizens on Chinese state media[1], the shift to the new two-child policy may disappoint those… Read more »

  • The Case for Girls in Coding

    Not too far away from the Ministry of Education in the overcrowded city of Prishtina, Kosovo, a group of eight young girls are working on developing Raporto, a platform for discreet and confidential reporting of gender discrimination in IT. Their weekends are spent in Hackershtelle, an IT community meet-up point organized and maintained by enthusiastic… Read more »

  • Introducing the New Senior Editors of the Cornell Policy Review

    The Cornell Policy Review is pleased to announce the 2016-2017 selections for Editor in Chief, Senior Managing Editor, and Senior Content Editor. Please join us in congratulating Peter C. Fiduccia, Ana Cañedo, and Harrison Speck on their new roles, which will officially begin in May of this year. As 2015-2016 Associate Editors, their committment to the quality of the publication has… Read more »

  • The Opacity of National Security Letters

    Transparency reports of electronic data requests are common for major communications and technology companies, but universities, which often act as small internet service providers, have yet to embrace transparency. Security activists are calling on universities to develop their own transparency reports, but it is important to understand what information these reports are not reporting.

  • Trade Negotiation: An Interview with Dr. Carolina Palma

    Cornell Policy Review Associate Editor Ana Canedo sits down with Carolina Palma, PhD, discussing a wide array of topics ranging from her professional career as a trade negotiator for Costa Rica to her research interests as a professor for the Public Administration faculty of the University of Costa Rica.

  • Sustainably Developing the Vietnamese Coffee Industry

    What will help develop the Vietnamese coffee market globally? Relevant development strategies must be explored, especially those that have been proven to be key contributors in other markets, including the Colombian coffee sector’s sustainable income-generation and its socioeconomic stability among small-scale coffee farmers.