Children and the British Border: UK Policy Hurting Lone Child Migrants

  Since September 2016, I have been working with unaccompanied minors in refugee camps in Northern France and on the streets of Paris and Calais, and have witnessed how policy decisions made by the British government have affected their lives. UK policies have removed unaccompanied minors from dangerous camps and street situations in Europe and… Read more »

Dropping Out of the Electoral College

Public Attitudes In the 1960s, Republicans were even more likely than Democrats to think the electoral college system of electing an American president should be replaced with a popular vote. Large majorities of both Democrats and Republicans continued to feel that way until the 2000 presidential election, when Democrat Al Gore won the national popular… Read more »

Politics, Family-Run Conglomerates, and Corruption in South Korea

  South Korea held its 19th presidential election yesterday. The ongoing vote count shows the leading candidate is Mr. Moon Jae-in of the liberal Democratic Party of Korea. A former human rights lawyer and the runner-up in the 2012 presidential election, Moon promises, among other things, a crackdown on corruption and reform of family-run conglomerates…. Read more »

The Feminization of Migration: Why are Women Moving More?

Historically, humans have left their homes to build a different, hopefully better, existence somewhere else. People break away from their countries of origin for several reasons, including lack of economic opportunities, social inequality, poverty, political repression, persecution, warfare, and natural disasters.[1] In 2016, more than 247 million people, or 3.4 percent of the world population,… Read more »

The One President Thesis: Do Politics Really “Stop at the Water’s Edge”?

There have been many historical iterations of the concept that the U.S. Congress behaves differently regarding foreign affairs than it does for domestic affairs. The first iteration of this was the two presidents thesis, which suggests that the president has increased latitude in foreign affairs and can consequently behave differently in that context than in domestic affairs.

30 Days of Demonetization in India

At midnight on November 8, 2016, Mr. Narendra Modi, the Prime Minister (PM) of India, declared in a broadcast to the nation that the two highest currency notes—Rs. 500 and Rs. 1000—would immediately cease to be legal tender. This move was considered a very drastic and bold step, especially since nearly 86% of all the currency by value in India was in the form of either Rs. 500 or Rs. 1000 notes.

Was the Syria Strike illegal? Explaining the International Law of Warfare

  The recent US missile attack against the sovereign state of Syria was an act of aggression bearing distinct resemblance to the strike on Iraq in 2003. On April 6, 2017, the United States military dropped nearly 60 cruise missiles at a Syrian airfield; this strike was in response to President Bashar al-Assad’s usage of… Read more »

Introducing the Upcoming Cornell Policy Review Board

The Cornell Policy Review is pleased to announce the 2017-2018 selections for Editor in Chief, Senior Managing Editor, Senior Content Editor, and Senior Public Relations Editor. Please join us in congratulating Arpit Chaturvedi, Paulina Lucio, Elizabeth Sweitzer, and Lillie Gabreski on their new roles, which will officially begin in May of this year. As Associate… Read more »

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Lobby Law in Chile: Democratizing Access to Public Authorities

The Lobbying Act of 2014, a reform 10 years in the making, and the commitments of the Chilean government in its Open Government Partnership (OGP) National Action Plan (NAP) to adopt and implement the legislation, must be situated in the wider context of reforms designed to combat corruption and promote transparency.

UK’s International Role, Post-Brexit

On June 23, 2016, a majority of the British people voted to leave the European Union. The political earthquake that followed Brexit is now beginning to stabilize, and the British population is beginning to demand answers about how future negotiations with the European Union (EU) will be carried out. The truth, as in all negotiations, is that there is no answer—outcomes will depend not only on the British government but also, clearly, on the position the EU takes.

Latest
  • Russian Disinformation: How U.S. Information Operations Need to Adapt

    Building on a legacy of propaganda and information warfare, Russia has displayed a unique ability to selectively obscure truth, seed doubt, and spread disinformation on a global scale. With Russia’s gaze set on the United States as a rival in an increasingly multipolar world, the United States has already felt the impact of these types of information operations (IO) through the hacking and selective releasing of emails relating to Hillary Clinton and the Democratic National Committee.

  • Empowered Policy: Evidence of Sustainable, Accessible, and Affordable Energy Resources

    edited by Shreya Bhardwaj Economic prosperity and societal well-being require a safe and reliable supply of energy resources. Energy and mineral resources are vital for the production of goods and services across all economic sectors: agriculture, infrastructure, transportation, commerce, healthcare, and tourism, among others. At the same time that energy resources contribute to a crucial… Read more »

  • How Much Will You Pay to Save the Amazon?

    Agricultural practices that preserve ecosystem services are growing. Nongovernmental organizations have taken a market-based approach, introducing certification programs which compensate farmers who adhere to sustainability standards for their consequent reductions in yield by charging consumers a price premium. We conduct a choice experiment to test consumers’ willingness to pay for such eco-labeled products.

  • Roses Must Be Tended: The Sweet Briar College Case

    On March 3, 2015, the Sweet Briar College Board of Directors announced that the college would cease its operations, due to “insurmountable financial challenges.” This announcement came as a shock to most alumnae—the 114-year-old women’s college had an endowment of $84 million, and the Board had done nothing to signal that the financial situation was… Read more »

  • Low Cost Meat, High Cost to Social Justice

    While the emergence of government oversight and creation of food safety laws helped transform meatpacking into a respectable industry, today we are witness to a return to unsanitary and unethical conditions. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, the meat processing and animal slaughtering industry has the highest rate of workplace illness in the United States.

  • Vidya Dadati Vinayam: The Ordeal to Open the Doors of Education

    Education liberates society and creates thinking individuals who tend to have the twin abilities to insulate themselves from dogma and propaganda and at the same time to open themselves up, to give their best to the outer world. It is the moral responsibility of the government of India, and indeed of each educated person in the nation, to ensure that education reaches those who have been deprived of it.

  • What is the Best Coping Strategy for Vulnerable Smallholder Farmers in Climate Change?

    The stress on water availability that has been induced by climate causes smallholders’ crop productivity to decline. Fang Zhang conducted a research in Nsanje district of Malawi as part of an effort to evaluate a program intervention and to understand vulnerable populations’ experiences in adapting to climate change.

  • Coaching Management: An Alternative to Performance Evaluation

    How many people can say that when they get told off for not reaching their target or for poor behavior they themselves thought of the solution? Well, the answer is many more than before. Coaching has become the new buzzword within management. Instead of conducting oft-dreaded annual performance reviews, many managers are switching to a… Read more »

  • Student Led Shutdowns: “Fees Must Fall” and the Fight for Affordable, Accessible Education in South Africa

    It has been twenty years since the end of Apartheid in South Africa, but student protests erupting across the nation’s universities suggest that two decades of African National Congress rule have not been enough to meet the demands for socioeconomic equality of many citizens. Images of students under the moniker “Fees Must Fall” battling police… Read more »

  • Interview with Senator Jorge Robledo of Colombia

    The Cornell Policy Review interviewed Senator Jorge Robledo, from Colombia, during his visit to the Cornell campus in Ithaca. He talked about the recent rejection of the peace process agreement in Colombia and other relevant issues.

  • Centralizing the Police Force: What It Means For Mexico’s Narco Violence

    It is a well-known fact to Mexican citizens, journalists and academics that, beginning 2007 when former President Felipe Calderon declared war on the drug cartels, Mexico became an extremely violent country: going from an average of 9,000 people killed a year to over 27,000. While the country’s murder rate still lags behind that of some… Read more »

  • Wa[te]r and Peace

    The summer of 2014 took me back to my ancestral village in central Punjab, Pakistan where my team of student volunteers and I installed a solar powered water pump in response to a severe water shortage, which had been exacerbated due to nationwide electricity shortfalls. The pump provides clean drinking water daily to roughly 1000 of the town’s 1,500 residents, and it has had a dramatic impact on the village’s economic and societal well-being.