Native Communities in Alaska: Vulnerabilities in Light of Climate Change

Introduction and Historical Background The State of Alaska is characterized by long distances between economic centers, sparsely populated rural communities, limited rescue personnel and equipment, and restricted means for transport and hospital resources. Most importantly, the access to the necessary resources in time of a crisis is not equally available to all the population of… Read more »

A Geospatial Analysis of the Physical and Economic Consequences of Rochester’s Inner Loop

In the early 1950s, planners in Rochester, New York made a decision that would impact transportation and development in the city for the next half-century. At the time, both the city’s population and the popularity of the automobile were increasing exponentially, meaning that traffic congestion through downtown was becoming particularly unmanageable. To relieve some of… Read more »

Analyzing Funding and Achievement Gaps in New York State Education Using GIS

Introduction: This article analyzes the funding and achievement gaps of New York State’s K-12 public schools, with a focus on differences among schools in rural, suburban and urban areas. New York’s public education system has one of the highest rates of per-pupil spending in the country, even after accounting for regional cost differences. In fact,… Read more »

A Spatial Analysis of Occupy Wall Street and its Occupiers

More than 5 years ago, Occupy Wall Street (OWS) sparked a public dialogue about the current economic situation in the United States, through protests in Zuccotti Park, New York City. OWS not only curated the discussion about the control money has over the government, but also the growth of social inequality throughout the nation. “We… Read more »

Source: https://www.facebook.com/komunaprishtine/

How to Clean Up a City – a Case Study on Stopping Illegal Construction in Kosovo

Commandment number 2 in promising to combat corruption in a small, developing country is to have a long-term, strategic plan. But perhaps that was not important because the newly elected Mayor of Prishtina, Shpend Ahmeti, might have not thought of commandment number 1, which is that there is a possibility that someone will kill you… Read more »

Letter from the Editor

  Today we are witness to an age inundated with competing information and amplified by social media, as we stand at the intersection of novel ideas and antiquated beliefs. In this complex world, made even more incomprehensible by widespread phenomena such as “fake news”, alternative facts, and superficial analysis, it may not be an exaggeration… Read more »

Children and the British Border: UK Policy Hurting Lone Child Migrants

  Since September 2016, I have been working with unaccompanied minors in refugee camps in Northern France and on the streets of Paris and Calais, and have witnessed how policy decisions made by the British government have affected their lives. UK policies have removed unaccompanied minors from dangerous camps and street situations in Europe and… Read more »

Dropping Out of the Electoral College

Public Attitudes In the 1960s, Republicans were even more likely than Democrats to think the electoral college system of electing an American president should be replaced with a popular vote. Large majorities of both Democrats and Republicans continued to feel that way until the 2000 presidential election, when Democrat Al Gore won the national popular… Read more »

Politics, Family-Run Conglomerates, and Corruption in South Korea

  South Korea held its 19th presidential election yesterday. The ongoing vote count shows the leading candidate is Mr. Moon Jae-in of the liberal Democratic Party of Korea. A former human rights lawyer and the runner-up in the 2012 presidential election, Moon promises, among other things, a crackdown on corruption and reform of family-run conglomerates…. Read more »

The Feminization of Migration: Why are Women Moving More?

Historically, humans have left their homes to build a different, hopefully better, existence somewhere else. People break away from their countries of origin for several reasons, including lack of economic opportunities, social inequality, poverty, political repression, persecution, warfare, and natural disasters.[1] In 2016, more than 247 million people, or 3.4 percent of the world population,… Read more »

Latest
  • Think of Grandma: The Future of Social Security

    Arguably, the evolution of civilization has been marked by the emergence and advancement of systems of economic support designed for its members. Whether by preserving food in anticipation of harsher weather or constructing strong networks of kith and kin to rely on in times of need, the intent of safeguarding against uncertainty has been instinctive… Read more »

  • TPP: The U.S. Perspective

    All the promising outcomes predicted for the TPP agreement, and the Obama Administration’s support of it, were not similarly reflected in the upcoming administration. The US President-elect, Mr. Donald Trump, asked about the fairness and the purpose of this trade agreement compared to other existing trade deals. He further referred to the partnership as a potential disaster for the USA. His election win signals the death of the TPP.

  • Gentrification, Public Transit, and Infrastructure in LA

    edited by Sofia Magdalena Olofsson Significance of the Infrastructure System of Los Angeles An adequate infrastructure system is necessary in order to bring vibrancy and prosperity to communities. Los Angeles, the city that has the second largest population in the United States has been struggling with notoriously congested freeways. Residents in Los Angeles have been… Read more »

  • Standing Rock Protesters Want More than Clean Water

      “Sometimes, you wake in 2016, but it feels like 1875 because Natives are still fighting for our land” – Native American writer Sherman Alexie Standing Rock, North and South Dakota: population 8,250. It’s a 3,500-square-mile reservation, the sixth-largest, in land area, in the United States. While its population is small, the reservation has garnered… Read more »

  • Rethinking Energy Subsidies in Mexico

    Subsidizing fossil fuel consumption has increased the income gap in the world´s population, since these subsidies have primarily benefited individuals with greater wealth. Globally, it is estimated that, in 2010, only 8% of the subsidies for fossil fuel consumption reached the poorest 20% of the world’s population.

  • The Heroin Epidemic: Policy Strategies for Solving a Two-sided Crisis

    Over the past decade, Mexico and the United States have experienced an heroin epidemic that might not be easily solved. An estimated 914,000 people reported using heroin in the past year in the United States, causing the death of over 47,000. How can the rapid increase of demand and supply of the drug be explained? Most importantly, how can it be solved?

  • Russian Disinformation: How U.S. Information Operations Need to Adapt

    Building on a legacy of propaganda and information warfare, Russia has displayed a unique ability to selectively obscure truth, seed doubt, and spread disinformation on a global scale. With Russia’s gaze set on the United States as a rival in an increasingly multipolar world, the United States has already felt the impact of these types of information operations (IO) through the hacking and selective releasing of emails relating to Hillary Clinton and the Democratic National Committee.

  • Empowered Policy: Evidence of Sustainable, Accessible, and Affordable Energy Resources

    edited by Shreya Bhardwaj Economic prosperity and societal well-being require a safe and reliable supply of energy resources. Energy and mineral resources are vital for the production of goods and services across all economic sectors: agriculture, infrastructure, transportation, commerce, healthcare, and tourism, among others. At the same time that energy resources contribute to a crucial… Read more »

  • How Much Will You Pay to Save the Amazon?

    Agricultural practices that preserve ecosystem services are growing. Nongovernmental organizations have taken a market-based approach, introducing certification programs which compensate farmers who adhere to sustainability standards for their consequent reductions in yield by charging consumers a price premium. We conduct a choice experiment to test consumers’ willingness to pay for such eco-labeled products.

  • Roses Must Be Tended: The Sweet Briar College Case

    On March 3, 2015, the Sweet Briar College Board of Directors announced that the college would cease its operations, due to “insurmountable financial challenges.” This announcement came as a shock to most alumnae—the 114-year-old women’s college had an endowment of $84 million, and the Board had done nothing to signal that the financial situation was… Read more »

  • Low Cost Meat, High Cost to Social Justice

    While the emergence of government oversight and creation of food safety laws helped transform meatpacking into a respectable industry, today we are witness to a return to unsanitary and unethical conditions. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, the meat processing and animal slaughtering industry has the highest rate of workplace illness in the United States.

  • Vidya Dadati Vinayam: The Ordeal to Open the Doors of Education

    Education liberates society and creates thinking individuals who tend to have the twin abilities to insulate themselves from dogma and propaganda and at the same time to open themselves up, to give their best to the outer world. It is the moral responsibility of the government of India, and indeed of each educated person in the nation, to ensure that education reaches those who have been deprived of it.