Native Communities in Alaska: Vulnerabilities in Light of Climate Change

Introduction and Historical Background The State of Alaska is characterized by long distances between economic centers, sparsely populated rural communities, limited rescue personnel and equipment, and restricted means for transport and hospital resources. Most importantly, the access to the necessary resources in time of a crisis is not equally available to all the population of… Read more »

A Geospatial Analysis of the Physical and Economic Consequences of Rochester’s Inner Loop

In the early 1950s, planners in Rochester, New York made a decision that would impact transportation and development in the city for the next half-century. At the time, both the city’s population and the popularity of the automobile were increasing exponentially, meaning that traffic congestion through downtown was becoming particularly unmanageable. To relieve some of… Read more »

Analyzing Funding and Achievement Gaps in New York State Education Using GIS

Introduction: This article analyzes the funding and achievement gaps of New York State’s K-12 public schools, with a focus on differences among schools in rural, suburban and urban areas. New York’s public education system has one of the highest rates of per-pupil spending in the country, even after accounting for regional cost differences. In fact,… Read more »

A Spatial Analysis of Occupy Wall Street and its Occupiers

More than 5 years ago, Occupy Wall Street (OWS) sparked a public dialogue about the current economic situation in the United States, through protests in Zuccotti Park, New York City. OWS not only curated the discussion about the control money has over the government, but also the growth of social inequality throughout the nation. “We… Read more »

Source: https://www.facebook.com/komunaprishtine/

How to Clean Up a City – a Case Study on Stopping Illegal Construction in Kosovo

Commandment number 2 in promising to combat corruption in a small, developing country is to have a long-term, strategic plan. But perhaps that was not important because the newly elected Mayor of Prishtina, Shpend Ahmeti, might have not thought of commandment number 1, which is that there is a possibility that someone will kill you… Read more »

Letter from the Editor

  Today we are witness to an age inundated with competing information and amplified by social media, as we stand at the intersection of novel ideas and antiquated beliefs. In this complex world, made even more incomprehensible by widespread phenomena such as “fake news”, alternative facts, and superficial analysis, it may not be an exaggeration… Read more »

Children and the British Border: UK Policy Hurting Lone Child Migrants

  Since September 2016, I have been working with unaccompanied minors in refugee camps in Northern France and on the streets of Paris and Calais, and have witnessed how policy decisions made by the British government have affected their lives. UK policies have removed unaccompanied minors from dangerous camps and street situations in Europe and… Read more »

Dropping Out of the Electoral College

Public Attitudes In the 1960s, Republicans were even more likely than Democrats to think the electoral college system of electing an American president should be replaced with a popular vote. Large majorities of both Democrats and Republicans continued to feel that way until the 2000 presidential election, when Democrat Al Gore won the national popular… Read more »

Politics, Family-Run Conglomerates, and Corruption in South Korea

  South Korea held its 19th presidential election yesterday. The ongoing vote count shows the leading candidate is Mr. Moon Jae-in of the liberal Democratic Party of Korea. A former human rights lawyer and the runner-up in the 2012 presidential election, Moon promises, among other things, a crackdown on corruption and reform of family-run conglomerates…. Read more »

The Feminization of Migration: Why are Women Moving More?

Historically, humans have left their homes to build a different, hopefully better, existence somewhere else. People break away from their countries of origin for several reasons, including lack of economic opportunities, social inequality, poverty, political repression, persecution, warfare, and natural disasters.[1] In 2016, more than 247 million people, or 3.4 percent of the world population,… Read more »

Latest
  • Was the Syria Strike illegal? Explaining the International Law of Warfare

      The recent US missile attack against the sovereign state of Syria was an act of aggression bearing distinct resemblance to the strike on Iraq in 2003. On April 6, 2017, the United States military dropped nearly 60 cruise missiles at a Syrian airfield; this strike was in response to President Bashar al-Assad’s usage of… Read more »

  • Introducing the Upcoming Cornell Policy Review Board

    The Cornell Policy Review is pleased to announce the 2017-2018 selections for Editor in Chief, Senior Managing Editor, Senior Content Editor, and Senior Public Relations Editor. Please join us in congratulating Arpit Chaturvedi, Paulina Lucio, Elizabeth Sweitzer, and Lillie Gabreski on their new roles, which will officially begin in May of this year. As Associate… Read more »

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    Lobby Law in Chile: Democratizing Access to Public Authorities

    The Lobbying Act of 2014, a reform 10 years in the making, and the commitments of the Chilean government in its Open Government Partnership (OGP) National Action Plan (NAP) to adopt and implement the legislation, must be situated in the wider context of reforms designed to combat corruption and promote transparency.

  • UK’s International Role, Post-Brexit

    On June 23, 2016, a majority of the British people voted to leave the European Union. The political earthquake that followed Brexit is now beginning to stabilize, and the British population is beginning to demand answers about how future negotiations with the European Union (EU) will be carried out. The truth, as in all negotiations, is that there is no answer—outcomes will depend not only on the British government but also, clearly, on the position the EU takes.

  • A Matter of Political Time: The Rise of Populist Leaders

    With the commotion of the 2016 U.S. Presidential election still echoing, pundits have looked inward to understand what the weekly polls got wrong. Incomplete sample sizes, overestimated voter turnouts, and incorrect assumptions about demographic loyalties are topping recent lists of explanations for how President Donald Trump captured over 270 electoral votes. Trump’s victory over long-time… Read more »

  • Environmentalism in the Space Age: An Analysis of the Space Junk Problem and Potential Solutions

    NASA has been studying debris hazards to (and caused by) spacecraft for over a decade, and there is a host of international organizations involved with the dense thicket of regulations governing environmental issues in outer space. Of particular concern is debris, more colloquially known as “space junk.”

  • Misleading Incentives – South Asian Farmers’ Use of Fertilizer

    Since the Green Revolution in the 1960s to 1980s, which introduced high-yielding varieties of crops, improved fertilizer, irrigation, and pesticides to agriculture in developing countries, South Asia’s appetite for inorganic fertilizer has not stopped. In 2012-3, fertilizer consumption in this area accounts for 18 percent of the world’s total usage. India alone consumed 28.1 million tons of fertilizer in 2010, making it number two in the world, after China. However, farmers in South Asia do not use the appropriate ratio of nitrogen (N), phosphate (P), and potash (K) fertilizer that would increase their yields.

  • Creating Corporate Social Responsibility for the Nonprofit Sector

    In the private sector, profit maximization has historically been the most important figure to measure success, yet in recent years there has been a nascent but powerful movement that also measures environmental and social implications. This approach to business has been popularized as “corporate social responsibility” (CSR) and is becoming more structured and legitimized with third party certifiers. Meanwhile the nonprofit, or plural sector, lacks a similar framework that allows donors to better understand business ethics.

  • Mobile Money Impact Evaluations: A Review

    The 2000 Millennium Development Goals established by the United Nations provided a universally agreed upon set of objectives for all its member nations to follow. The first Goal that was identified was the elimination of poverty. Eradication of poverty subsequently became the focus of many initiatives by many organizations and governments around the world. To address some of the problems related to poverty, Mohamed Yunus started a financing scheme that would later develop into microfinance.

  • An Outsider Look at the US Presidential Elections

    Almost 650 days have passed since Hillary Clinton announced her candidacy for the Presidency. Nearly 550 since President-elect Donald Trump did the same. More than a year and a half since this competition started, I cannot believe it is finally over and Donald Trump has been inaugurated as President. Certainly, the results were shocking for most of us: for the campaigns, for the pollsters, and for the pundits, among others.

  • Green Courts: The Way Forward?

    This paper analyzes the viability of having green courts with dedicated environmental jurisdiction, separate from the general judicial system. In doing so, an effort has been made to take the National Green Tribunal (NGT) of India as a reference point for discussing the advantages and disadvantages of green courts. While acknowledging that both pros and… Read more »

  • Family Farms Fuel Brazil’s School Lunch Program

    Brazil’s national school meals program is buttressing the local food movement by mandating a system of structured demand so that a portion of the food come from family farms. Supporting the resilience of rural lifestyles and feeding 40 million students a day, this program is food for thought, and it demonstrates an important paradigm shift in how we envision food assistance programs by focusing on nutritional, rather than caloric, intake.