Children and the British Border: UK Policy Hurting Lone Child Migrants

  Since September 2016, I have been working with unaccompanied minors in refugee camps in Northern France and on the streets of Paris and Calais, and have witnessed how policy decisions made by the British government have affected their lives. UK policies have removed unaccompanied minors from dangerous camps and street situations in Europe and… Read more »

Dropping Out of the Electoral College

Public Attitudes In the 1960s, Republicans were even more likely than Democrats to think the electoral college system of electing an American president should be replaced with a popular vote. Large majorities of both Democrats and Republicans continued to feel that way until the 2000 presidential election, when Democrat Al Gore won the national popular… Read more »

Politics, Family-Run Conglomerates, and Corruption in South Korea

  South Korea held its 19th presidential election yesterday. The ongoing vote count shows the leading candidate is Mr. Moon Jae-in of the liberal Democratic Party of Korea. A former human rights lawyer and the runner-up in the 2012 presidential election, Moon promises, among other things, a crackdown on corruption and reform of family-run conglomerates…. Read more »

The Feminization of Migration: Why are Women Moving More?

Historically, humans have left their homes to build a different, hopefully better, existence somewhere else. People break away from their countries of origin for several reasons, including lack of economic opportunities, social inequality, poverty, political repression, persecution, warfare, and natural disasters.[1] In 2016, more than 247 million people, or 3.4 percent of the world population,… Read more »

The One President Thesis: Do Politics Really “Stop at the Water’s Edge”?

There have been many historical iterations of the concept that the U.S. Congress behaves differently regarding foreign affairs than it does for domestic affairs. The first iteration of this was the two presidents thesis, which suggests that the president has increased latitude in foreign affairs and can consequently behave differently in that context than in domestic affairs.

30 Days of Demonetization in India

At midnight on November 8, 2016, Mr. Narendra Modi, the Prime Minister (PM) of India, declared in a broadcast to the nation that the two highest currency notes—Rs. 500 and Rs. 1000—would immediately cease to be legal tender. This move was considered a very drastic and bold step, especially since nearly 86% of all the currency by value in India was in the form of either Rs. 500 or Rs. 1000 notes.

Was the Syria Strike illegal? Explaining the International Law of Warfare

  The recent US missile attack against the sovereign state of Syria was an act of aggression bearing distinct resemblance to the strike on Iraq in 2003. On April 6, 2017, the United States military dropped nearly 60 cruise missiles at a Syrian airfield; this strike was in response to President Bashar al-Assad’s usage of… Read more »

Introducing the Upcoming Cornell Policy Review Board

The Cornell Policy Review is pleased to announce the 2017-2018 selections for Editor in Chief, Senior Managing Editor, Senior Content Editor, and Senior Public Relations Editor. Please join us in congratulating Arpit Chaturvedi, Paulina Lucio, Elizabeth Sweitzer, and Lillie Gabreski on their new roles, which will officially begin in May of this year. As Associate… Read more »

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Lobby Law in Chile: Democratizing Access to Public Authorities

The Lobbying Act of 2014, a reform 10 years in the making, and the commitments of the Chilean government in its Open Government Partnership (OGP) National Action Plan (NAP) to adopt and implement the legislation, must be situated in the wider context of reforms designed to combat corruption and promote transparency.

UK’s International Role, Post-Brexit

On June 23, 2016, a majority of the British people voted to leave the European Union. The political earthquake that followed Brexit is now beginning to stabilize, and the British population is beginning to demand answers about how future negotiations with the European Union (EU) will be carried out. The truth, as in all negotiations, is that there is no answer—outcomes will depend not only on the British government but also, clearly, on the position the EU takes.

Latest
  • Misleading Incentives – South Asian Farmers’ Use of Fertilizer

    Since the Green Revolution in the 1960s to 1980s, which introduced high-yielding varieties of crops, improved fertilizer, irrigation, and pesticides to agriculture in developing countries, South Asia’s appetite for inorganic fertilizer has not stopped. In 2012-3, fertilizer consumption in this area accounts for 18 percent of the world’s total usage. India alone consumed 28.1 million tons of fertilizer in 2010, making it number two in the world, after China. However, farmers in South Asia do not use the appropriate ratio of nitrogen (N), phosphate (P), and potash (K) fertilizer that would increase their yields.

  • Creating Corporate Social Responsibility for the Nonprofit Sector

    In the private sector, profit maximization has historically been the most important figure to measure success, yet in recent years there has been a nascent but powerful movement that also measures environmental and social implications. This approach to business has been popularized as “corporate social responsibility” (CSR) and is becoming more structured and legitimized with third party certifiers. Meanwhile the nonprofit, or plural sector, lacks a similar framework that allows donors to better understand business ethics.

  • Mobile Money Impact Evaluations: A Review

    The 2000 Millennium Development Goals established by the United Nations provided a universally agreed upon set of objectives for all its member nations to follow. The first Goal that was identified was the elimination of poverty. Eradication of poverty subsequently became the focus of many initiatives by many organizations and governments around the world. To address some of the problems related to poverty, Mohamed Yunus started a financing scheme that would later develop into microfinance.

  • An Outsider Look at the US Presidential Elections

    Almost 650 days have passed since Hillary Clinton announced her candidacy for the Presidency. Nearly 550 since President-elect Donald Trump did the same. More than a year and a half since this competition started, I cannot believe it is finally over and Donald Trump has been inaugurated as President. Certainly, the results were shocking for most of us: for the campaigns, for the pollsters, and for the pundits, among others.

  • Green Courts: The Way Forward?

    This paper analyzes the viability of having green courts with dedicated environmental jurisdiction, separate from the general judicial system. In doing so, an effort has been made to take the National Green Tribunal (NGT) of India as a reference point for discussing the advantages and disadvantages of green courts. While acknowledging that both pros and… Read more »

  • Family Farms Fuel Brazil’s School Lunch Program

    Brazil’s national school meals program is buttressing the local food movement by mandating a system of structured demand so that a portion of the food come from family farms. Supporting the resilience of rural lifestyles and feeding 40 million students a day, this program is food for thought, and it demonstrates an important paradigm shift in how we envision food assistance programs by focusing on nutritional, rather than caloric, intake.

  • Think of Grandma: The Future of Social Security

    Arguably, the evolution of civilization has been marked by the emergence and advancement of systems of economic support designed for its members. Whether by preserving food in anticipation of harsher weather or constructing strong networks of kith and kin to rely on in times of need, the intent of safeguarding against uncertainty has been instinctive… Read more »

  • TPP: The U.S. Perspective

    All the promising outcomes predicted for the TPP agreement, and the Obama Administration’s support of it, were not similarly reflected in the upcoming administration. The US President-elect, Mr. Donald Trump, asked about the fairness and the purpose of this trade agreement compared to other existing trade deals. He further referred to the partnership as a potential disaster for the USA. His election win signals the death of the TPP.

  • Gentrification, Public Transit, and Infrastructure in LA

    edited by Sofia Magdalena Olofsson Significance of the Infrastructure System of Los Angeles An adequate infrastructure system is necessary in order to bring vibrancy and prosperity to communities. Los Angeles, the city that has the second largest population in the United States has been struggling with notoriously congested freeways. Residents in Los Angeles have been… Read more »

  • Standing Rock Protesters Want More than Clean Water

      “Sometimes, you wake in 2016, but it feels like 1875 because Natives are still fighting for our land” – Native American writer Sherman Alexie Standing Rock, North and South Dakota: population 8,250. It’s a 3,500-square-mile reservation, the sixth-largest, in land area, in the United States. While its population is small, the reservation has garnered… Read more »

  • Rethinking Energy Subsidies in Mexico

    Subsidizing fossil fuel consumption has increased the income gap in the world´s population, since these subsidies have primarily benefited individuals with greater wealth. Globally, it is estimated that, in 2010, only 8% of the subsidies for fossil fuel consumption reached the poorest 20% of the world’s population.

  • The Heroin Epidemic: Policy Strategies for Solving a Two-sided Crisis

    Over the past decade, Mexico and the United States have experienced an heroin epidemic that might not be easily solved. An estimated 914,000 people reported using heroin in the past year in the United States, causing the death of over 47,000. How can the rapid increase of demand and supply of the drug be explained? Most importantly, how can it be solved?