A Spatial Analysis of Occupy Wall Street and its Occupiers

More than 5 years ago, Occupy Wall Street (OWS) sparked a public dialogue about the current economic situation in the United States, through protests in Zuccotti Park, New York City. OWS not only curated the discussion about the control money has over the government, but also the growth of social inequality throughout the nation. “We… Read more »

Source: https://www.facebook.com/komunaprishtine/

How to Clean Up a City – a Case Study on Stopping Illegal Construction in Kosovo

Commandment number 2 in promising to combat corruption in a small, developing country is to have a long-term, strategic plan. But perhaps that was not important because the newly elected Mayor of Prishtina, Shpend Ahmeti, might have not thought of commandment number 1, which is that there is a possibility that someone will kill you… Read more »

Letter from the Editor

  Today we are witness to an age inundated with competing information and amplified by social media, as we stand at the intersection of novel ideas and antiquated beliefs. In this complex world, made even more incomprehensible by widespread phenomena such as “fake news”, alternative facts, and superficial analysis, it may not be an exaggeration… Read more »

Children and the British Border: UK Policy Hurting Lone Child Migrants

  Since September 2016, I have been working with unaccompanied minors in refugee camps in Northern France and on the streets of Paris and Calais, and have witnessed how policy decisions made by the British government have affected their lives. UK policies have removed unaccompanied minors from dangerous camps and street situations in Europe and… Read more »

Dropping Out of the Electoral College

Public Attitudes In the 1960s, Republicans were even more likely than Democrats to think the electoral college system of electing an American president should be replaced with a popular vote. Large majorities of both Democrats and Republicans continued to feel that way until the 2000 presidential election, when Democrat Al Gore won the national popular… Read more »

Politics, Family-Run Conglomerates, and Corruption in South Korea

  South Korea held its 19th presidential election yesterday. The ongoing vote count shows the leading candidate is Mr. Moon Jae-in of the liberal Democratic Party of Korea. A former human rights lawyer and the runner-up in the 2012 presidential election, Moon promises, among other things, a crackdown on corruption and reform of family-run conglomerates…. Read more »

The Feminization of Migration: Why are Women Moving More?

Historically, humans have left their homes to build a different, hopefully better, existence somewhere else. People break away from their countries of origin for several reasons, including lack of economic opportunities, social inequality, poverty, political repression, persecution, warfare, and natural disasters.[1] In 2016, more than 247 million people, or 3.4 percent of the world population,… Read more »

The One President Thesis: Do Politics Really “Stop at the Water’s Edge”?

There have been many historical iterations of the concept that the U.S. Congress behaves differently regarding foreign affairs than it does for domestic affairs. The first iteration of this was the two presidents thesis, which suggests that the president has increased latitude in foreign affairs and can consequently behave differently in that context than in domestic affairs.

30 Days of Demonetization in India

At midnight on November 8, 2016, Mr. Narendra Modi, the Prime Minister (PM) of India, declared in a broadcast to the nation that the two highest currency notes—Rs. 500 and Rs. 1000—would immediately cease to be legal tender. This move was considered a very drastic and bold step, especially since nearly 86% of all the currency by value in India was in the form of either Rs. 500 or Rs. 1000 notes.

Was the Syria Strike illegal? Explaining the International Law of Warfare

  The recent US missile attack against the sovereign state of Syria was an act of aggression bearing distinct resemblance to the strike on Iraq in 2003. On April 6, 2017, the United States military dropped nearly 60 cruise missiles at a Syrian airfield; this strike was in response to President Bashar al-Assad’s usage of… Read more »

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  • Online Launch: Spring 2013 Issue

    It is my pleasure to introduce this issue of The Cornell Policy Review. As an interdisciplinary policy journal, we present a wide range of political and policy-related articles. As editors of The Review, we have the opportunity to read, research, and work with a variety of topics across substantive policy areas. Not only does this… Read more »

  • Implementing Performance Measurement: Reflections on Tompkins County New York

    By: Luis A. Martinez and Henry McCaslin About the Authors:  Luis A. Martinez is a second-year graduate student in the Department of City and Regional Planning at Cornell University. His professional focus is organizational strategy and design in the public and social sectors. Specifically, Luis is interested in performance measurement indicators, metrics, and evaluation strategies in… Read more »

  • The Effect of Private Detention Policy on Immigrant Political and Social Incorporation

    By: Greg Jette Abstract:  Immigration policy remains a contentious issue at both the federal and state levels,and post 9/11, has overwhelmingly favored detention and deportation strategies. Private detention companies have gained increasing political and economic influence as national rhetoric has characterized many immigrant groups as posing a threat to national security. As a result, private detention… Read more »

  • Foreign Direct Investment’s Influence on Regional Inequality and Innovation in Hungary

    By: Mallory Young Abstract: The Central and Eastern European Countries’ (CEEC) transition from socialist states to open-market democracies has been a long and arduous affair; however, many argue that CEECs are finally developing a solid economic standing. A global powerhouse since the early 2000s, Eastern Europe has seen continued economic growth and a steady influx… Read more »

  • Global Digital Divide: The Role of Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) in 21st Century Democracy

    By: Chisheng Li Abstract Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) play a critical role in a citi- zenry’s access to information, opportunities, and ability to participate in democratic practices. Recent worldwide events such as the Arab Spring have underscored ICTs’ and social media’s importance in bringing about social change and engagement. Research shows that ICT infrastructure and… Read more »

  • Advising the Executive Branch: The Role of Federal Advisory Committees and Ways to Evaluate Their Effectiveness

    By: Amanda K. Mullan Abstract The Federal Advisory Committee Act1 (FACA) stipulates that advisory committees must be more accessible to the public. To accomplish this, FACA requires the General Services Administration (GSA) to oversee advisory committees and report certain information to Congress and the public. Despite increased openness and account-ability, the Act falls short in a… Read more »

  • A Letter from the Editor – Fall 2012

    Recognizing deliberate and unintended effects of public decision-mak- ing is critical for implementing equitable policy at the local, national, and international levels. The authors of the articles presented in this issue of The Cornell Policy Review seek to do just that. From implementing performance measurement for greater municipal transparency, to examin- ing the effects of… Read more »

  • 2012 Fall Review – Full Issue

  • Welcome to the Cornell Policy Review

    The outward expression of interest in public administration and public policy denotes an inner desire to understand and improve upon the collective programs and actions that impact us all. By visiting and exploring The Cornell Policy Review, you have taken the first step in joining a community of thinkers and actors at the Cornell Institute for Public Affairs (CIPA). We are constantly striving to evaluate and articulate various approaches to policymaking, and we encourage you to delve deeper into the practice with us by reading on.

    – Michael Donovan, MPA 2012, Editor-in-Chief

  • Spring 2012 – Letter from the Editor

    The outward expression of interest in public administration and public policy denotes an inner desire to understand and improve upon the collective programs and actions that impact us all. By visiting and exploring The Cornell Policy Review, you have taken the first step in joining a community of thinkers and actors at the Cornell Institute for Public Affairs (CIPA). We are constantly striving to evaluate and articulate various approaches to policymaking, and we encourage you to delve deeper into the practice with us by reading on.

    – Michael Donovan, MPA 2012, Editor-in-Chief

  • The Cornell Policy Review: Volume 2, Number 2, Spring 2012

    Click here to view a PDF of the Spring 2012 Review

  • Hyper-Partisan Sorting in the American Electorate, 1976-2008

    An Article by Thomas L. Day