Using South Africa’s Wine Industry as a Paradigm for Sustainable Policy

South Africa’s wine industry excels in sustainability, what can the public sector can learn from it?

Encoded Laws, Policies, and Virtues

With artificial intelligence systems becoming an increasingly important factor in government and business, public policy professionals must be prepared to engage with the biases that can influence artificial intelligence.

When Affirmative Action Becomes Diversity Only

How effective is race-based affirmative action as a tool of compensatory justice for African-American students who come from families that have endured continual oppression in the United States?

17 best of 2017

The best articles of 2017 from the Cornell Policy Review!

Why Drug Courts Are Not the Way Forward on America’s Opioid Crisis

Trump’s Opioid Commission thinks drug courts are the answer to the nation’s opioid epidemic. Research shows they are flawed and even harmful to people with opioid use disorders.

Trump’s Jerusalem Announcement and Its Impact on U.S. International Standing

The recent Trump announcement about the status of Jerusalem has been denounced throughout the Arab world and the international community. Protests have erupted in Jerusalem and Gaza, and the Israeli government has rejoiced. How will this move impact the U.S international reputation both now and in the future, and why?

The Need for Institutional Reform at the National Minorities Commission, India

Arpit Chaturvedi discusses ways in which the National Commission for Minorities in India could be ameliorated with institutional reforms.

cornell policy review

Introducing our First Class of Associate Managers

The Cornell Policy Review proudly announces its first-ever class of Associate Managers.

Improving Public Service Delivery in Pakistan

CIPA MPA Fellow Mohammad Zohair proposed a public service delivery system for Pakistan using the Vision, Mission, Capacity and Learning Framework created by Cornell University professors Derek and Laura Cabrera.

Rigging Elections: A Spatial Statistics Analysis of Political and Unintentional Gerrymandering

The 2016 election cycle was fraught with claims of election rigging. Though mostly unsubstantiated, there may be some truth to these claims — at least at the congressional level.

Latest
  • Coaching Management: An Alternative to Performance Evaluation

    How many people can say that when they get told off for not reaching their target or for poor behavior they themselves thought of the solution? Well, the answer is many more than before. Coaching has become the new buzzword within management. Instead of conducting oft-dreaded annual performance reviews, many managers are switching to a… Read more »

  • Student Led Shutdowns: “Fees Must Fall” and the Fight for Affordable, Accessible Education in South Africa

    It has been twenty years since the end of Apartheid in South Africa, but student protests erupting across the nation’s universities suggest that two decades of African National Congress rule have not been enough to meet the demands for socioeconomic equality of many citizens. Images of students under the moniker “Fees Must Fall” battling police… Read more »

  • Interview with Senator Jorge Robledo of Colombia

    The Cornell Policy Review interviewed Senator Jorge Robledo, from Colombia, during his visit to the Cornell campus in Ithaca. He talked about the recent rejection of the peace process agreement in Colombia and other relevant issues.

  • Centralizing the Police Force: What It Means For Mexico’s Narco Violence

    It is a well-known fact to Mexican citizens, journalists and academics that, beginning 2007 when former President Felipe Calderon declared war on the drug cartels, Mexico became an extremely violent country: going from an average of 9,000 people killed a year to over 27,000. While the country’s murder rate still lags behind that of some… Read more »

  • Wa[te]r and Peace

    The summer of 2014 took me back to my ancestral village in central Punjab, Pakistan where my team of student volunteers and I installed a solar powered water pump in response to a severe water shortage, which had been exacerbated due to nationwide electricity shortfalls. The pump provides clean drinking water daily to roughly 1000 of the town’s 1,500 residents, and it has had a dramatic impact on the village’s economic and societal well-being.

  • The Impacts of Ending China’s One-Child Policy

    On October 29, 2015, China scrapped its one-child policy, allowing all couples to have two children for the first time since strict family planning rules were introduced more than three decades ago. Despite the optimistic responses of some demographers and citizens on Chinese state media[1], the shift to the new two-child policy may disappoint those… Read more »